Resources

Briefs

Policy Brief
Risk Governance Policy Brief

This policy brief is the product of testing, learning and adapting a mainstreaming approach to resilient development in the Pacific. It is based on an in-depth review and analysis of global and regional literature on approaches to mainstreaming, climate change and disaster risk management and governance reforms.

Country Briefs
Fiji Country Brief

The Pacific Risk Resilience Programme (PRRP) supports the Government of Fiji’s efforts to achieve resilient development outcomes as outlined in Fiji’s National Development Plans.

Solomon Islands Country Brief

The Pacific Risk Resilience Programme (PRRP) supports the Government of Solomon Island’s efforts to achieve resilient development outcomes as outlined in the National Development Strategy, 2016-2035 (NDS).

Tonga Country Brief

The Pacific Risk Resilience Programme (PRRP) supports the Government of Solomon Island’s efforts to achieve resilient development outcomes as outlined in the National Development Strategy, 2016-2035 (NDS).

Vanuatu Country Brief

The Pacific Risk Resilience Programme (PRRP) supports the Government of Solomon Island’s efforts to achieve resilient development outcomes as outlined in the National Development Strategy, 2016-2035 (NDS).

Practice Briefs
Agriculture Network Practice Briefs

Recognising the need to improve resilience of farming in the Pacific, and the government’s role in doing so, an informal network of government officials from Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu has been established to share information, mobilise resources and jointly advocate for a range of issues related to building resilience in the sector.

Local Government Network Practice Brief

Every day across the Pacific region, local decisions are made about community development. The new Framework for Resilient Development in the Pacific (FRDP) warns that cumulatively, these decisions can affect the outcomes of disasters: a cost saving measure on a community hall deems it ineffective as a cyclone evacuation centre; a water pump project fails because it is located in an area that floods; a health centre has to be relocated because it is too close to an eroding coast line.

Private Sector Practice Brief

Given their inherent strengths, there is a great opportunity for the private sector in the Pacific to play a central role in building community resilience, and for their potential contributions to be better utilised during disaster response and recovery. In recognition of this opportunity, the Pacific Islands Private Sector Organisation (PIPSO) established the Pacific Business Resilience Network, with support from the Connecting Business Initiative (CBi), and PRRP.

Results

Annual Reports
PRRP Annual Report

The Pacific Risk Resilience Programme (PRRP) has been operating since 2013 and over these last four years it has helped to nurture an enabling environment for ‘risk-informed’ development in its programme countries. It is not only a ‘flagship’ initiative under UNDP’s resilient and sustainable development team, but also resonates with our broader work in the Pacific to achieve the 2030 Agenda across many goals including gender equality, food security, economic development and effective governance. In the spirit of inter-connectedness of all development goals, PRRP looks for solutions beyond sectoral or institutional boundaries.

ProPa Annual Report

Climate change and disaster risk cannot be understood without recognizing the gender and social dimensions of vulnerability and capacity. There is recognition regionally and globally, that climate and disaster risks are inextricably linked to development. Slow and rapid-onset disasters have the potential to set-back years of development gains with di erentiated impacts for marginal groups.

Country Annual Reports
Fiji Annual Report

Fiji is ranked as the 14th most exposed country in the world to natural disasters. In February 2016, Fiji was struck by one of the most powerful storms on record in the Southern Hemisphere – Tropical Cyclone Winston. Approximately 59,000 people were left in need of emergency shelter along with an estimated USD60 million in damage to food crops and the agriculture sector.

Solomon Islands Annual Report

Solomon Islands is ranked as the sixth most at risk country in the world to natural disasters.1 Solomon Islands has been struck by several cyclones including Tropical Cyclone Pam and Tropical Cyclone Raquel in 2015. Both cyclones exacerbated the impacts from flooding in April 2014, which killed 22 people, washed away houses and destroyed key infrastructure and food crops.

Tonga Annual Report

In recent years, Tonga has been struck by several damaging cyclones including Tropical Cyclone Ian in 2014. Such events cause extensive damage to infrastructure and destroy food crops, leaving many communities without adequate food, water or shelter.

Vanuatu Annual Report

Vanuatu is ranked as the one of the most at risk countries to disasters.1 In 2015, Vanuatu was struck by one of the worst disasters ever to hit the Pacific region, Tropical Cyclone Pam. Approximately 75,000 people (32 percent of the population) were left in need of emergency shelter and 96 percent of food crops in affected areas were destroyed.

Mid Term Evaluation Report
PRRP MTE Report 2017

The following notes and responses are intended to provide a clear statement of management views on the performance and strategic direction of the Pacific Risk Resilience Programme (PRRP). These are largely based on a mid-term evaluation (MTE) of the programme conducted in 2016 as well as the PRRP Annual Report 2016/2017 developed with programme partners. The main MTE document that follows contains the independent evaluation of progress and recommendations for future programming through the MTE.

Articles

Knowledge Products

Focus Notes
Private Sector Focus Notes

Given their inherent strengths, there is a great opportunity for the private sector in the Paci c to play a central role in building community resilience, and for their potential contributions to be better utilised by government and partners. The consequences of climate change and disasters are experienced by all sectors of society, private and public, and the public sector cannot effectively manage these risks alone (UNISDR, 2015).

Policy Brief
Risk Governance Policy Brief

This policy brief is the product of testing, learning and adapting a mainstreaming approach to resilient development in the Pacific. It is based on an in-depth review and analysis of global and regional literature on approaches to mainstreaming, climate change and disaster risk management and governance reforms.

Risk Governance Toolkit
Practice Note
Risk Informing Development Practice Note

Development should work for, not against, resilience. Climate change and disaster events have the potential to set-back years of development gains. This is often caused by ‘unchecked’ development which can increase people’s vulnerability and this varies significantly by gender and social dimensions.